Month: November 2012

Engraved Johnnie Walker Blue Label

Custom Engraved Johnnie Walker Blue Label

Custom Engraved Johnnie Walker Blue Label

You and special someone   both can enjoy by bringing home a bottle of    Custom Engraved Johnnie Walker Blue Label  ($225). Individually numbered, each 750ml  bottle comes with the message of your choice in gold engraving right below the label. You can order your own bottle by the weg: MELANDROSE.COM or calling us at 323-655-5557

 

Advertisements

Double Cross Vodka

DOUBLE CROSS VODKA

As the only vodka ever to win the Gold Medal for both taste and design at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition, Double Cross Vodka (34.99)  is as tasty as its bottle is amazing. Double Cross is made in the Slovak Republic using a seven-step distillation process, and is filtered seven times using diamond-dust micro filters, active charcoal, and limestone for an extra clean taste. Perfect for your next celebration.

GIFT BASKET AVAILABLE:

Gran Patron Burdeos Tequila

Gran Patrón Burdeos Tequila

If you’re ready to take your celebratory boozing to the next level,
Gran Patron Buerdeos Tequila  ($535.00) is just the stuff. Distilled from the finest blue agave, this ultra-premium dark tequila is matured in a blend of American and French oak barrels and aged for a minimum of 12 months. It’s then distilled again in vintage Bordeaux barrels from France. Each unleaded crystal bottle comes in a black walnut box with a special corkscrew and a crystal bee stopper.

Sam Adams Utopia

Sam Adams Utopias

Meant to be savored and sipped at room temperature, Samuel Adams Utopias   is only for the most daring of beer connoisseurs.

The 2009 batch is the strongest yet, with a staggering 27% alcohol by volume rating (a standard beer is about 5%). The rich, dark, uncarbonated (and world’s strongest) beer is brewed in small batches, blended, and aged in the Barrel Room at the Samuel Adams Boston Brewery, where you’ll find only 53 barrels of the stuff. The limited-edition 2009 batch of Utopias is bottled in numbered, ceramic brew kettle-shaped decanters.

MAKER’S 46

Maker’s 46

A new, even smoother version of Maker’s Mark? Yes, please. Maker’s 46  ($34) begins life as normal Maker’s, removed from the barrel when it’s fully matured. While it’s removed, 10 seared French oak staves are attached to the inside of the barrel, then the Maker’s goes back in to begin the months long process of becoming 46, a process which adds natural caramel, vanilla, and spice flavors without adding any bitterness. Only 25,000 cases will be shipped this year, so if you’re wanting to give it a try and see it in our store, don’t hesitate, unless of course someone is robbing said store at that very moment, in which case you should run.

MIDNIGHT MOON MOONSHINE

Image

MIDNIGHT MOON MOONSHINE 

Just in case you’re not up on your NASCAR history, the sport has its origins in bootlegging during Prohibition — and so did one of its earliest stars, Junior Johnson. Now Johnson’s family recipe is being followed to create Midnight Moon Moonshine . Handcrafted in small batches, it’s made from corn in a copper still, and is ready to stand up against even higher end vodkas. We’ve been downing the fruit flavored ones all week, and they’re mighty tasty — not to mention potent.

One thing you left out on Thanksgiving was “Wine”

Image

IT’S the absolute last minute. All your Thanksgiving preparations are in order. Almost. “Oh no! I knew I forgot something … the wine!”

Thanksgiving Favorites

Beaujolais-Villages makes for a quick, easy solution for a wine shortage.

No, you are not alone. You may have ignored or overlooked the dutifully creative suggestions for Thanksgiving bottles dispensed by wine writers countrywide last week, but I will not wag an admonishing finger. Now is the time for action, not recriminations. So here are quick, easy solutions to last-minute beverage problems.

IT’S TOO LATE TO TRACK DOWN IDEAL BOTTLES. WHAT CAN I GET THAT’S EASY TO FIND AND CHEAP?

When in doubt, think Beaujolais. This is true even in those uncivilized corners of the earth that don’t celebrate Thanksgiving. It’s a versatile, juicy, joyous red that will go with almost anything. Ordinarily, I gravitate toward the best small producers, like Jean-Paul Brun, Pierre-Marie Chermette, Marcel Lapierre, Jean Foillard, Daniel Bouland and Julien Sunier, just to name a few. But now is not the time for a search.

Instead, Beaujolais-Villages wines from larger-scale négociants like Louis Jadot and Joseph Drouhin should be as easy to find now as pilgrim hats and turkey basters, whether you’re shopping at suburban supermarkets or your local bodega wine shop. Wines from the very good 2010 vintage are fresh and energetic. Best of all, they’ll only set you back around $10 a bottle.

THIS IS AN AMERICAN HOLIDAY. WHERE’S YOUR PATRIOTISM?

No need to bring politics into it. You want American? I got American. Year after year, Marietta Cellars makes Old-Vine Red, a blend both of vintages and grapes, like the old-timers in California used to do it. These wines are labeled by lot numbers rather than vintage years. The last two, 57 and 58, are bright and spicy, usually cost no more than $12 a bottle and are widely available.

THERE YOU GO TALKING ONLY ABOUT REDS AGAIN. HOW ABOUT AN AMERICAN WHITE?

My standby is the $15 Finger Lakes riesling from Ravines. This is a great wine, but alas not so readily available outside New York. Leo Steen chenin blanc from Dry Creek Valley in California is another great $15 bottle, likewise not in every shop. Frankly, the mass-market American white-wine pool under $15 is tough going. Here’s a thought: Oregon pinot gris, particularly recent vintages from King Estate, a large producer that makes dry, energetic and reasonably priced wines, generally $12 to $15 a bottle.

 

If you want a white, how about a Muscadet? Like barberas, these tangy whites are lively and versatile enough to go with anything you might hazard to place on the Thanksgiving table. In his new book, “Thanksgiving: How to Cook It Well,” my colleague Sam Sifton recommends against serving filling preliminary dishes, with one appetizing exception: oysters. If you eat them with Muscadet, you will be in heaven. Look for entry-level bottles from excellent producers like Domaine de la Pépière, Luneau-Papin or André-Michel Brégeon, which should run $15 or less. Better yet, see if you can find a few magnums for impressive effect.

ENOUGH ALREADY! I JUST WANT TO HAVE BUBBLY.

Well, why not? Sparkling wines are superb partners for a huge range of foods. I know I’m going to start my Thanksgiving with Champagne, and I wouldn’t hesitate to stick with it throughout the meal. But you’re not going to find good Champagne these days for less than $35 or so. No worries, though, plenty of inexpensive alternatives exist, and you can confidently buy American if you choose.

 

CAN’T BEAR TO THINK ABOUT THANKSGIVING ANYMORE. WHAT DO I DRINK AFTERWARD?

Try a beer. Or a hot toddy. But if you really need a pick-me-up, remember the words Fernet Branca. It’s an Italian Digestive, a distinctively bitter blend of many herbs that, in my experience, restores that sense of equilibrium when you’ve had about all you can take. You’ll thank me, and your stomach will thank me.