red wine

LABOR DAY – WHAT WINE TO SERVE WITH YOUR BBQ

Labor Day with our family sometimes begins local craft brews; such as not your NOT YOUR FATHERS ROOT BEER and you most defiantly can’t go wrong with good, cold beer in a tub of ice. My husband like me, are committed to being wine fans. Choosing the right wines isn’t as easy as you might think.  Often times, he would say it’s totally about the meat, the technique, and the sauce! I happen to agree

.  bbq-wine

There are many flavors you’ll come across while barbecuing: umami, smoky, salty char, and sometimes sweetness and savory. They’ll vary by which area you are eating the BBQ like in Texas barbecue, beef rules, either brisket or ribs, and is often served with a sweet, hot tomato-based sauce. The flavor is deeply smoky, the meat rich. On the other hand Southern-style like North Carolina pork barbecue, hang on on vinegar-based sauces and lighter spice rubs.

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So for a stern wine-and-barbecue conversation, big, heavy, high-alcohol reds seem heavy with rich meat goes great with chilled rosé.

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What you want for all types of barbecues are wines that rub the smoke and sauce off your tongue so you can take another fresh bite.  So with dense, ingratiating brisket needs the difference and refreshment of acidity and bright fruitiness. We are great drinkers of Super Tuscan wine barbecue pairing. These big, heavy, high-alcohol reds seem ponderous with rich meat. We feel biased just thinking about the combo. Here are some tips on what to try instead:

  • Rosé (“the beer of the wine world”) with barbecue.  Me, too—and the fruitier the better, to hold its own with smoked meat.
  • Syrah or some people call it Shiraz with your spicy chicken wings
  • White wine with barbecue only if it’s grilled shrimp or chicken with citrus-y rubs can be delicious with tart, floral-scented vinho verde, we’d rather drink bubbly or a chilled rosé.
  • Reds – Save big, bold, tannic, high-dollar reds, such as cabernet, for char-grilled steaks. The quick cooking doesn’t break down the meat’s fat the way hours in a barbecue pit do, but the wine’s tannin will do the trick.
  • Forget oaky wines. The meat is already smoky enough, and a spicy sauce will make the wine’s oak character stand out even more.
  • Keep your choices simple. Grilled foods and barbecue have so many intense flavors that wine nuances will be lost.
  • Pulled pork and succulent ribs go very well with lively pinot noir and with other high acid, lighter reds or rosés that can be chilled.
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Manteo Wine: Paying Homage to Those Who Came Before

Wine-making has been around nearly as long as human civilization itself.  So when the first English settlers arrived on Roanoke Island, they brought wine-making along with them.  They soon found two kinds of wild grapes growing on the island, which helped sustain them and the natives they soon encountered.  Though it would be a while before wine-making began in earnest in the New World, a 400-year-old strand of that grape still grows on the island, a clipping of which will soon be planted at American Pioneer Wine Growers new vineyard in Geyserville, California.

To commemorate this, they are releasing four bottles of wine to reveal the name of the vineyard.  The second of those bottles is Manteo, named after the Native American chief who helped the colonists and later became a trusted diplomat.  A rich Sonoma County red blend crafted with 28% Syrah, 16% Petit Verdot, 16% Cabernet Sauvignon, 15% Cabernet Franc, 13% Petite Sirah, 6% Merlot, 4% Malbec, and 2% Zinfandel, Manteo debut vintage offers depth and balance along with rich, flagrant flavors of boysenberries, black cherries and cassis; featuring aromatic spices of pink peppercorns and notes of earthy minerals, tobacco leaves and smoky, toasted oak.

A truly remarkable bottle with a rich back story, Manteo is a bottle history won’t soon forget.

What’s up with all the Sulfites in my Wine?

“Contains Sulfites” – I am sure you have seen these small words on the back or bottom of a wine label too often. Do you need to be concerned?  How much sulfites are in wine and how do they affect you?  Do you think your headache is caused by sulfites?  And ultimately Are sulfites in wine bad?

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About 5-10% of people with asthma have severe sulfite sensitivity and thus the US requires labeling for sulfites above 10 parts per million (PPM). Sulfur is on the rise as a concern among humans as a cause of health problems (from migraines to body swelling) because of its prevalence in processed foods.

Sulfur in Wine vs. other foods?

Depending on the production method, style and the color of the wine, sulfites in wine range from no-added sulfur (10-40 PPM) to about 350 PPM. If you compare wine to other foods, it’s placed far lower on the spectrum. For example, many dry red wines have around 50 PPM.

  • lower acid = more sulfur
  • more color (red) = less sulfur than white wines.
  • higher sugar = more sulfur —> secondary fermentation of sugar
  • higher Temperature = more release of sulfur

Why we need sulfites in wines?

SULFITES  = PRESERVATIVE

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Should I be concerned about sulfites in wine?

If you have sensitivity to foods, you should absolutely try to eliminate sulfites from your diet. Eliminating wine could be necessary. Perhaps start your sulfur witch hunt with the obvious culprits (like processed foods) before you write-off wine.

Do different drinks effect our spirits differently?

what mood are you in?

 

 

There must be a reason alcoholic beverages are called “spirits.” Do different drinks affect our spirits differently? DIA went digging. We found plenty of theories — most of them from armchair analysts who have “proof” that: “Champagne makes me happy.” “Wine makes me flirty.” “Beer makes me tired.” “Whiskey turns me into a jerk.”

“It’s the alcohol, stupid!” Yes, WE know. But is there more to it?

There is lots of scientific jibber jabber that says the whole thing is a fake, and its just based on the amount of alcohol you are consuming, and there should be no difference between various types.

What do we think? The amount of alcohol you are consuming obviously has to do with it – but some people have different drinking habits with different drinks. If someone loves red wine, and hates beer, they will probably end up drinking more red wine, and at a faster pace. In this case, they will get the impression that they are more flirty when they drink red wine, compared to when they drink beer, if only because they are getting more alcohol into their body.

Or maybe its the mood that comes first: we choose a beverage based on our moods. When we’re sad, we drink whiskey. When we’re happy, it’s champagne. When we want to party, its tequila. That could give us the impression that the drink actually makes us feel the way we are already feeling.

What do you think? Do you have moods associated to certain drinks?