Spring Wines

Image

I love the arrival of Spring!  

 
Spring has definitely sprung around these parts and while we are  fully cognizant of the fact that we are  going to get caught in a trap, it’s a good idea to think of wines for spring already!  Sipping summery whites and enjoying  transitional seasons is the key.

Spring seems to last a month in the west coast and a  weekend  in most of the east coast, maybe an entire week if you are  lucky, so you have to be prepared for it or all of a sudden you’ll be sitting in sodden shorts like it’s August! With that in mind, it’s time to look for white wines that make the transition from snappy spring days to the crisper nights that follow them!

Sauvignon Blanc

 Sauvignon Blanc lead up to those heights of brightness,  with  a softer, rounder, richer version of Sauvignon, one that has some barrel age, maybe blended with a bit of Semillon too.

That’s white Bordeaux and West Coast Sauvignon Blanc territory in my mind, with both regions producing many great examples. The Bordeaux tend to be a bit leaner with the oak being somewhat more obvious. The fruit in Bordeaux is subtle, elegant and complex when compared to the New World’s big, rich, bold fruit which embraces the oak and incorporates it a bit better.

Viognier

Spring is  awakening of  your senses. The light is brighter and the air is warm and soft, but the real money shot each spring is smelling the fruits, flowers, grasses and trees as they crank up their production schedules. Allergy season can be bothersome, but smelling spring is being alive!

A great white to pair with such a florid season is Viognier, possessor of its own array of arresting aromas. Classic Viognier is all about flowers and peaches, things we can all look forward to from summer as we enjoy the immediacy of a fine Viognier. Virginia‘s wineries are earning quite a reputation for their Viognier. 

Fiano or Falanghina

The competing whites of southern Italy.    Being in the heart of Italy’s wine country, Campania seems like an odd place for classic white wines. Regardless, both Fiano, with its rich texture and slightly herbal aromas, and Falanghina, with more body, structure and tropical fruit notes, absolutely thrive there. These are great wines for spring. They are rich yet refreshing and very food-friendly

 

Image

Chenin

Chenin Blanc is quite the chameleon, producing wines that range from sharp as a razor to sweet as honey, with everything in between- including bubbles. It’s not surprising that it might be considered a wine for all seasons, the trick is finding those that are right for spring. The  lightly off-dry versions for this time of year, something that the Loire Valley really excels at, though I have to give South Africa its due. South African producers have certainly reshaped their Chenin market over the past decade and the wines are among the great values of the white wine world told today. If you want big value on a budget, choose Chenin.

Funky Whites

Funky white is a pretty broad term. What the heck classifies as funky after all.  It  is something out of your comfort zone, or simply a little crazy and undiscovered.

Try something like   a lightly sweet Vouvray style wine from South Africa that is delicious and addictive, and you will be hooked!

If that doesn’t sound like your speed, how about something in the orange wine end of the spectrum (white wines with skin contact). These tend to be a little, well, funky but are worth trying. There is no time like the present, so jump into a bottle of Foradori Nosiola. A very gentle touch of skin contact makes this an easy to approach, easy to appreciate white, rich with orchard fruit and floral/herb notes buffered by a hint of tannins. Yum!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s